Further updates

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  • There is a small piece about Joseph Brown in the Express & Star on 15 September 1916, but it does not give any further information.
  • There is a Roger S. Carr, birth year 1897 death record of 1965 in Bilston. There arealso records of a Roger Shackleton Carr being entitled to a Victory/British war medal. He seems to have something to do with the Wolverhampton Steam Laundry also. http://records.ancestry.co.uk/roger_shackleton_carr_records.ashx?pid=4766346
  • There is a Walter George Cole born Bilston,Staffs 1877 in the 1911 census living in “The Poplars Stables Edgware MX, Edgware, Middlesex, England” Occupation Gardener, and whose eldest daughter (Hilda Mary) was born 1903 in Wolverhampton.
  • crookAn article appeared about Frederick Crook’s funeral in the Express & Star on 13 October 1915, along with this accompanying photograph:
  • Bert Mattox is also commemorated on the Wednesfield Village War Memorial. He was transferred to the King’s Liverpool Regiment from the North Staffordshire Regiment and was killed at the 3rd Battle of Ypres (Passchendale).
    His family story reveals an even deeper level of tragedy. Bert’s father, Edward, was a patient at Stafford County Lunatic Asylum in 1911 where he died about 18 months later at around the age of 46. Edward’s wife and later widow, Mary Ann Emery, moved from 24 High Street to 3 Court 2 High Street. Courts often indicate poorer housing and the 1911 census records indeed record that Mary Ann and Bert were living in just a 2 room household. Bert’s only other surviving sibling, Frank, had joined the first South Staffs (Regiment number 8864) and was serving as a private aged 18.
    The 1st South Staffs disembarked at Zeebrugge on 6 October 1914 and Frank was killed just 21 days later on 27 October during the first Battle of Ypres. He was 22. He is buried at St Juien Dressing Station Cemetery, around 9 kms from Ypres, and also commemorated on the Wednesfield Memorial.
    The Mattox family were largely key makers and a feature of the Wednesfield village community. Most family members can be traced back to Moses Mattox born in Wednesfield in 1750. Some sources state that Mattox is a derivation of Mattocks. Bert’s grandfather, another Moses, was brother to John Mattox who established the successful firm of John Mattox & Sons, Key Manufacturers, at Colonial Works on Amos Lane, a building that survives as flats today.
  • According to Albert Ward Spencer Molineaux’s casualty card, indexed here, he died as a result of the pilot fainting and falling on his controls.
  • There is a small piece about Cyril Richards in the Express & Star published 15 September 1916, but it does not provide any more detail.
  • David Tempest is mentioned in the Express & Star on 12 May 1916 as one of the “Nine Black Country Men Killed.”

William Bentley

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bentleyThe Express & Star proudly proclaims on 2 January 1915 that a local young man, by the name of W. Bentley, who had emigrated to Canada several years previously, “has thrown up an important engagement to answer the call of his King and country.” Apparently his mother felt that he might have made a mistake in taking this choice, “suggesting he might get killed”, but his response was “I shall die doing my duty.” The article went on to state that Mr Bentley had been “connected with the telephone undertaking” whilst in Wolverhampton.

It is this last statement that gives us a likely candidate for this man, as there is a 17-year-old William Bentley in the 1901 census who was a telegraph messenger. This man was born in Shifnal, Shropshire, in 1884. By 1901 he was at 95 Bright Street, Wolverhampton, together with his parents, John and Mary A. Bentley, brother Frank, sisters Rose and Sarah, and grandparents Jane and Thomas Penson.

Without any further information it is difficult to track this man down, as it is not clear whether he enlisted in one of the Canadian regiments or came back to this country to do so. If anybody has any further details, please get in touch!

Percival Dyson

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Percival Dyson was born in Wolverhampton in 1897, the son of Thomas and Clara Dyson. In 1901 he was living at 114 Horseley Fields with his grandparents, Mathias and Sarah Dyson, his parents, his sisters Daisy and Gertude, and brother Thomas.

Percival enlisted in the Durham Light Infantry (number 7360). On 9 February 1917, his name was listed in the Express & Star among the wounded, but he survived the war. In 1920 he married Sarah E. Cain, and the couple had four daughters – Annie, Doreen, Sheila and Elizabeth – between 1922 and 1936. Percival died in 1938 at the age of 41.

Samuel Cartwright

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Samuel Cartwright was born in Wolverhampton in 1897, the son of Samuel and Ada Cartwright. In 1901 they were at 54 Moore Street, together with Samuel’s brother, Isaiah, and sisters Elizabeth, Lucy, Maria and Mary. His father, Samuel, died at the age of 36 later that year.

Samuel enlisted in the 1st Battalion of the King’s Own Scottish Borderers (number 27465). He died on 11 April 1918, at the age of 20. He is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial in Belgium

Charles Clinton

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clintonCharles Clinton was born in Wolverhampton in 1889, the son of Thomas and Harriet Clinton. In 1901 they appeared at 108 Sweetman Street, together with Charles’s siblings Elizabeth and Frank.

In 1907, Charles enlisted with the 1st Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 8366) and served in South Africa before the First World War. He was killed in action on 3 November 1914 and is commemorated at the Harlebeke New British Cemetery in Belgium. He appeared in the Express & Star on 19 January 1915.

Thomas William Banting

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Thomas, the brother of Frederick Charles Banting, was born in Warwickshire in about 1889. In 1901 he appears alongside his family at 77 Gorsebrook Road. He later became a Fitter for the London and North Western Railway.

In 1916 Thomas enlisted with the Motor Transport Depot in the predecessor of the Royal Air Force, the Royal Flying Corps, and became a Sergeant (number 115176). He died on 4 October 1919 and is buried at Wolverhampton Borough Cemetery. Although he died after the war, the fact that he appears on the local roll of honour and is listed on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission site indicates that his death was war-related. He appears on the roll of honour at Wolverhampton Cemetery, and a photograph of his grave (which also includes an inscription to his brother), appears here.

Ada Beatrice Bantock

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Ada Beatrice Barber was born in West Bromwich in 1871. In 1893, she married Walter Thomas Bantock in King’s Norton, and by 1901 they were living at The Foxlands, in Penn. They appeared here together with Ada’s son, Munro Bantock (born in 1899), a visitor, Jessie Payton, and six servants – Sarah Ann Roberts, Hannah Bentley, Nellie Nalley, Selina Dance, Mary Matthews and John Evans. Ada is here listed as “Ann B. Bantock”. They are at the same address in 1911, together with visitor Margaret Duncalfe and servants Sarah Annie Hoxchin, Emily Ludge, Mary Ellen Hay Cox and Florrie Ayers. Her son was presumably away at school by this date, as there does not appear to be a record of his death.

From 8 March 1916 until August 1917, she served part-time in the B.R.C.S. Workrooms (presumably British Red Cross Society) in Stafford, and it states in brackets that she was an “Expert”. She does not appear to have had any further children. Ada died in Stroud, in Gloucestershire, in 1953.

 

Harry Anker

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The son of William and Katie Anker, Harry was born in 1896. His birth was registered in Haslingden, Lancashire, although his entry on the 1901 census seems to suggest that he was born in Wolverhampton. In 1901 they were at 82 Cannock Road, together with Harry’s sisters Louisa and Marian.

Harry enlisted as a Gunner in the 50th Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery (number 820180). He died on 28 April 1918, by which point his parents were living at 46 Red Cross Street. He is buried at the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery in Belgium, and is commemorated in the Lady Chapel and on the roll of honour at St Peter’s Church.

Joseph Arkinstall

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Joseph Arkinstall was born in Wolverhampton in 1888, the son of Elizabeth Arkinstall. Elizabeth Barratt married William Arkinstall in 1880, but by 1890 she was remarrying a Harry Carter. I have not been able to find a record of the death of a William Arkinstall, although it is possible that Elizabeth and William got divorced, as Joseph is living with a William Arkinstall in both 1891 and 1911. Alternatively, there is also the death of a 36-year-old Thomas Arkinstall in 1888, who would be about the right age to be Joseph’s father.

In 1891, Joseph was living with his grandparents John and Jane Arkinstall at Court 5, House 1, Brickkiln Croft, together with his aunts Sarah Goodhead and Annie Arkinstall, and uncles John and Thomas Arkinstall, along with William Arkinstall, possibly his father. By 1901 he was living with another aunt, Fanny Cotterill, at 59 Pond Lane, together with his cousin (also Fanny Cotterill) and sister Jane Arkinstall. Finally by 1911 he was living at 13 Bloomsbury Street with another aunt and uncle, Richard and Annie Haynes, his cousins Mary, Thomas, William, Joseph and Albert Haynes, and, again, William Arkinstall. By this date Joseph has become a plasterer.

Joseph enlisted in the 1st/6th Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 4751). On 18 August 1916, he died of wounds received in action, and this was reported in the Express & Star on 15 September 1916. His next of kin was given as his mother, Mrs E. Betsy Carter, and step-father, Harry Carter, of 4 Manor Street, Tettenhall. He is buried at the Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery in Saulty, and is commemorated on the St Paul’s Church war memorial.

Francis Nicholas Andrews

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The Imperial War Museum has posted to Flickr a digitised collection of images of First World War soldiers, entitled “Faces of the First World War“. These images were amongst the first items collected by the museum when it was founded in 1917. One of these is a photograph of Francis Nicholas Andrews.

Francis was born in Wolverhampton in 1895, the son of Reverend John and Mary Alice Andrews (nee Baker). In 1901 they were living at Trysull Vicarage, together with Francis’s brother, Robert, and two servants, Lucy A. Barton and Lucy E. Carter. Francis attended the King’s School in Worcester. According to the Record of service of solicitors and articled clerks with His Majesty’s forces, 1914-1919 he later became an articled clerk to S. R. Andrews, of Bourne, Lincolnshire.

When the war broke out, Francis joined the Public Schools Battalion as a Private, and was later given a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the 15th Battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles, serving in France. On 11 October 1915, he died from sickness contracted as a result of wounds received. This was reported in the Express & Star on 22 September 1916. A note on the back of his medal card states “Rev J. W. Andrews applies for medals on behalf of in respect of late son Lieut F. N. Andrews.” He is buried at the Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille. He is also commemorated on the Trysull war memorial, as well as on the war memorial for King’s School, Worcester, and on one of the King’s School Cloister windows at Worcester Cathedral.

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