Albert Lloyd

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Albert was born in Monmore Green, Wolverhampton in 1893, the son of Jeremiah and Mary Ann Lloyd. In 1901 they were living at 13 Charles Street, Wolverhampton. By 1911, he was living with his brother, Jeremiah, and sisters Florence and Caroline, at 13 Barker Street, Wolverhampton. Albert was a general labourer at a nut and bolt works (Bayliss, Jones and Bayliss). He married Ada Rutter in Wolverhampton in 1913, and the couple had a son, Albert, in 1914.

Albert enlisted with the 7th Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 10484), first serving in the Balkans from 21 July 1915. He was wounded, and while being evacuated on the H. S. Gascon, he died at sea at Alexandria on 2 August 1915. He is buried at the Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, and is commemorated on the Monmoor & Victoria Works Memorial.

Arthur Samuel Evans

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An A. S. Evans appears on the roll of honour for the Weldless Steel Tube Company Limited. The only man born in Wolverhampton with these intitials is Arthur Samuel, born in 1880, so this is presumably the same man. He was the son of John and Emma Evans, and was living with his parents, brothers John and William and sister Elizabeth, in Bilston in 1881. He married Beatrice Perry in Wolverhampton at Wolverhampton Registry Office on 26 March 1904, and they had four children – Clara Elizabeth, Evelyn Maude, Maggie Gwendolun and Arthur James Croft.

On 8 May 1915, he enlisted with the 6th South Staffordshire Regiment (number 4186), when his trade was given as “labourer”. His address was given as 18 New Street, Heath Town. On 14 September 1915, he was discharged because he was “not likely to become an efficient soldier on medical grounds”, having not even left the country during his period of service. A report to the Medical Board stated that he had pulmonary tuberculosis. He died on 25 March 1917 in Wolverhampton.

Former curate of St George’s, Wolverhampton, killed

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An article in the Express & Star on 5 November 1917 states that the Reverend J. Hamilton, Vicar of St George’s Church, had announced in the Sunday service that the Reverend H. Dickinson, a former curate, had been killed in Flanders while acting in his capacity as chaplain to the Artist’s Rifles.

Dickinson was the eldest son of a Mr R. H. Dickinson, chief engineer to the Birmingham Corporation Tramways. He was 32 when he died, having been educated at King Edward’s School, Camp Hill, and the High School, New Street. He spent two years at Queen’s College, before being appointed housemaster at Stanley House School in Bristol Road. He did an MA at Durham University,w as ordained, and initially appointed to a curacy in the Durham area. He then moved to St George’s Wolverhampton, before transferring to a church in Saltley as Priest-in-charge. He became a vicar of Stephen’s in 1917, but later volunteered for service at the front.

I have been unable to confirm details about this man. There is a Henry Dickinson born in Birmingham who would be about the right age, but I have not been able to trace him further.

Michele Cacchione

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The brother of Antonio Cacchione, Michele appears on the war memorial of Ss. Mary and John Roman Catholic Church, Snow Hill. He also appears along with his parents and siblings at 12 Graiseley Street, Wolverhampton, in 1911. Michele is an ice cream vendor and organ grinder. But he did not appear with his family on the 1901 census, so presumably he was still in Italy at that time, where he was born in about 1891.

However, I have not been able to find any more information on him, presumably because he served and died with the Italian army. One of his relatives has also been trying to find further information on this man. The little booklet produced by the church on its centenary in 1955, simply has the following to say about the memorial:

By now the War was over and many men of the parish had died for their country: it was fitting that they should have a visible memorial within the church they had loved. A plaque was cast giving the names of all those who had died, and as an additional memorial, in 1920, the church was lit by electricity.

Albert Edward Betts

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Albert was born in Tipton in 1890, the son of Albert E. and Sarah Betts. In 1901. He appeared with his parents at 21 Wellington Street, Walsall, in 1901, along with his brothers James and Thomas, and sister Sarah.

Albert enlisted with the 2nd Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 9286). An article appeared in the Express & Star on 26 January 1916, stating that Mrs Betts, of 19 Woden Road, Heath Town, was “greatly concerned as to the whereabouts or fate of her son”. He had been reported as wounded and missing on 20 September 1914, and all inquiries had proved fruitless. Unfortunately, he was later confirmed to have been killed in action on that date. He is comemmorated on the La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial, as well as on the memorial at Heath Park.

George Thomas Woods/Wood/Whoods

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George was born in Coseley in 1888, the son of George and Fanny Wood. In 1891, they were living at 5 Webb Street, Sedgley, together with George’s siblings Mary A., Margaret J., William, Alice, Sarah J. and Ellen. By 1901, they were living at 40 Thompson Street, Bilston. In 1911 (now listed as Woods), they appeared at 168 Wellington Road, Bilston, and George was a shop assistant for a draper’s.

George served with the 25th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers (number 48184). He died of wounds in France on 25 April 1917, and is buried at the Boulogne Eastern Cemetery. He is presumed to be the “George T. Whoods” listed on the Queen Street Congregational Church memorial.

Thomas Corbett Price

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Thomas was born in Wolverhampton in 1885, the son of Thomas and Sarah Price. In 1901 he was living with his parents at 370 Newhampton Road West, along with siblings Helena D., Edith S., William, John W., Olive E., and Ivy E. Thomas (known as “Corbett”) was a solicitor’s clerk. He married Frances Ellen Storey in Hackney in 1907, and the couple were living with their daughter, Olive Evelyn Frances, at Alfearn Road, Lower Clapton, London, by 1911 (although Corbett’s place of birth was now given as Newport, Wales).

Corbett enlisted in the 6th Battalion of the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, but was attached to the 43rd Trench Mortar Battery (number 34482). He appears to have been serving as “Claude Hamilton”. He died on 22 February 1917, one hundred years ago today, and is buried at the Etaples Military Cemetery.

John Henry Hill

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John was born in Portobello, Willenhall, in about 1892, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Ann Hill. His father, Thomas, died in 1897, and his mother remarried, to a Richard Ford, in 1898. So, by 1901, John was living with his mother, step-father and sister Sarah Ann at Court 10, New Street, Portobello. The family were at 76 Moseley Village, Willenhall Road, by 1911, by which date Richard and Elizabeth had had three children – Edwin, Lilly and Ernest. John (here simply called “Henry”) was a “Stamper (Horse shoe)”.

John enlisted with the 8th Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (service number 12274), first serving in France from 1 August 1915. He was wounded and sent back home to England, where he died at the 1st Northern Hospital in Newcastle on Tyne on 21 February 1917, exactly one hundred years ago today. He is buried at the Heath Town (Holy Trinity) churchyard, and commemorated on the Heath Park memorial, as well as on the Deans Road Roll of Honour.

Antonio Cacchione

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Antonio was born on 29 August 1899 in Wolverhampton to Italian parents, Domenico and Martella/Marta. By 1911, the family were living at 12 Graisley Street, Wolverhampton, along with Antonio’s siblings Michele, Carmine, Maria, Filomena, Giuseppe and Maria.

Antonio (now anglicised as Anthony), enlisted with the 4th Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment as a Private (number 48299). On 27 May 1918 he was captured unwounded at Craonne and sent as a prisoner to Cassel. He survived the war, and was one of the returning prisoners invited by the proprietors of the Express & Star to a dinner and entertainment at the Baths Assembly Rooms, in March 1919. Antonio/Anthony died in Wolverhampton in 1968.

Henry George Beeton

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Henry only had a fleeting link with Wolverhampton, having been born in Thetford in 1895. The son of Henry Thomas and Louisa Mary Beeton, it was not until 1911 that he appeared in Wolverhampton, at Mill Cottages, Pendeford, with his parents and sister Marjorie. By this date, the 16-year-old Henry was a carter at a Corporation Sewage Farm.

At Wolverhampton, he enlisted as a Signaller in the 9th Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment. He first served in France from 30 August 1915 (although he is listed on the Medal Rolls Index Cards as “Harry”). He was killed in action on 15 September 1916. On the Army Registers of Soldiers’ Effects, as well as his mother and sister, another legatee is mentioned, a Miss Winifred Richardson. Henry is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.