Wilfred James Bolton

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Wilfred was born in Birmingham in 1882, the son of Samuel J. and Georgiana Bolton. At some point, he married a lady called Harriet, and they moved to 52 Navigation Street, Wolverhampton, but I have been unable to confirm further details.

He enlisted with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (number 7364), but was killed in action on 17 January 1915 at St Yves. He is buried at the Prowse Point Military Cemetery in Belgium.

George Bodley

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George was born in Wolverhampton in 1898, the son of William and Mary A. Bodley. In 1901, they were living on North Street, together with George’s siblings Fanny, William, Lily M. and Benjamin. By 1911, they were at 47 Well Lane, Wednesfield, along with a further three siblings – Violet, Richard and Sidney. George later worked for the Weldless Steel Tube Company Ltd.

George appears on the Roll of Honour for that company, as one of the employees who served during the First World War, and there are a few possibilities that could be him. He survived the war, but I have not been able to confirm whether he got married or had children. He died in Wolverhampton in 1939 at the age of 42.

William Reynolds (1895)

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Research for this blog has been done by work experience pupil Georgina Jones, from Pool Hayes Academy, Willenhall

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reynolds-williamWilliam was born in Wolverhampton in 1895, the son of John and Mary Reynolds. He was living with his parents at 42 Prestwood Road, Heath Town, in 1911, along with siblings John, Ethel Winnie and Sidney. William was a warehouseman.

In 1912, he enlisted with the 9th Lancers (number 4064). In the course of his service during the First World War he had three horses shot from under him, but escaped injury himself. Unfortunately, on 26 May 1915, he succumbed to gas poisoning. An article about him appeared in the Express & Star on 26 June 1915. He is buried at Hazebrouck Communal Cemetery, and is remembered at the memorial at Heath Park.

George Frederick Butler

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butler - gGeorge was born in Somerset in about 1894, the son of George Thomas and Rose Florence Butler. By 1911, they were living at Britannia Cottage, Deans Road, Heath Town, Wolverhampton, along with George’s many brothers and sisters, Thomas Ernest, Ida Lilian, Violet Maud, Mildred Vaughan, Winifred Agnes, Florence Gladys, Robert Wilfred, and Archibald James. George was learning to be a tool fitter at Jenks & Cattell. George was also a member of the Holy Trinity Church choir.

George enlisted with the 1st/6th South Staffordshire Regiment (number 1770), first serving in France from 5 March 1915. On 7 April 1915, when acting as a sentry and getting in position to fire his rifle over the parapet of his trench, he was shot through the right temple by a German sniper. He lay unconscious for four hours, when he then passed away. Details of his death were announced in the Express & Star on 13 April 1915. He is buried at the Wulvergem Churchyard in Belgium, and is remembered on the memorial at Heath Park.

Help please!

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As our appeal for help last month was so successful, here are some more individuals who we are struggling with. If anybody can help with providing more information on these people, we would love to hear it:

Surname First name(s) Known information Source
Marsh Samuel
  • Served in the Royal Army Medical Corps (service number 51023)
  • He was wounded
Express & Star 27 January 1917
Nicholls  B.
  • Worked for the Weldless Steel Tube Company Ltd
  • Served in the war
  • Survived the war
Roll of Honour of the Weldless Steel Tube Company Ltd.
Pearce
  • Police constable in Wolverhampton Borough Police Force
  • Rejoined the army in April 1915
Chief Constable’s Report Book
Rendall E. P.
  • He was in his fifties during the war
  • He was a plumber and pipe-fitter
  • He volunteered to substitute for a PE Abbott as a Waterworks Inspector while Abbott served in the war.
1914-1918 forum discussion
Savage  Harry
  • Worked for Mander Brothers Ltd
  • Served in the war
  • Presumably died during the war
Mander Brothers Memorial
 Taylor  George A.
  • Served with the Sherwood Foresters (number 80131)
  • Wounded
Express & Star 28 May 1917
Warrender Henry
  • Served with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (number 26650)
  • Died of wounds on 14 December 1916
Express & Star 20 January 1917 and CWGC
 Alcock  G.
  • Worked for the Weldless Steel Tube Company Ltd
  • Served in the war
  • Survived the war
Roll of Honour of the Weldless Steel Tube Company Ltd
Baker Cyril
  • Attended Penn Road Wesleyan Chapel
  • Served in the war
  • Survived the war
Roll of Honour of Penn Road Wesleyan Chapel
Careless George Augustus
  • Served as a Private in the D. C. L. I.
  • Died during the War
Wolverhampton Roll of Remembrance

John McCarthy

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John was born in Wolverhampton in 1897, the son of John and Charlotte McCarthy. In 1901, they were living at 24 Lawyer’s Field, Wolverhampton, along with siblings Mary Ann and Thomas. They were at the same address in 1911, with a further two siblings, Kathleen and Charlotte. Apparently John was employed on the railway at some point, but I have not been able to confirm that.

At the outbreak of war, John enlisted in the 1st Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 9833), first serving in France from 17 December 1914. He was killed in action on 18 March 1915 at the age of only 17, and is remembered at the Rue-du-Bois Military Cemetery, Fleurbaix. An announcement of his death appeared in the Express & Star on 10 April 1915.

Robert Herbert Hawkswood

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hawkswoodRobert was born in Wolverhampton on 11 November 1893, the son of Herbert and Harriet Hawkswood. In 1901, they were living at 72 Bilston Road, Wolverhampton, along with Robert’s siblings Charles, Violet and Clarence. By 1911, they were at 2 Portland Place, Bilston Road, and Robert had an additional two siblings, Doris Edith and Williem Henry. By this date, Robert was an engine cleaner for a railway company. He started working for the Great Western Railway at Stafford Road 10 October 1910. He became 3rd Chief Fireman on 20 November 1911 at Tyseley, but resigned on 21 June 1912.

He enlisted with the 1st Battalion of the Grenadier Guards in 1912 (number 15979). He rose to become a Lance Corporal, but was reported missing in October 1914. On 23 July 1915, the Express & Star confirmed that he had been killed in action on 29 October 1914. He is remembered at the Ypres (Menin Gate) memorial.

Elijah Warilow

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warrilow-1Elijah was born in Wolverhampton in 1886, the son of George Warrilow. On 16 November 1908 he married Elizabeth Cheshire at St Mary’s Church, Wolverhampton, and they had two children, Albert Edward and Selina Florence. In 1911, they were living with Elizabeth’s parents and family at 68 Herbert Street, Wolverhampton. Elijah was a tinsmith for a hollowware manufacturer. Unfortunately, both children died later that year. The couple went on to have a further two children, Elizabeth Alexandra in 1915 and Florence Lorraine in 1918.

On 24 June 1904 he enlisted in the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (number 8314), by which date he was already serving in the 3rd Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment. On 24 June 1908, he was transferred to the Reserves.

On the outbreak of war, he was mobilised and posted to France. He was Mentioned in Despatches on 18 October 1914. He transferred to the Royal Engineers (number 276054) in 1917.

warrilow-2On 2 January 1915, he is featured in the Midland Counties Express, where the article states that his bravery means that he has been recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal, as well as for a French decoration. By this date, his address is given as 51 Dale Street, Wolverhampton. The Express & Star of 6 April 1915 tells how he was presented with the Distinguished Conduct Medal by Brigadier-General Nugent at Hull.

Warilow had gone into action with his company at Le Cateau and only nine men were left. Warilow picked up a wounded man and carried him to safety, then returned, under fire to rescue a wounded sergeant of the Royal Fusiliers. Despite himself being wounded by shrapnel, he continued to do his duty, rescuing three other wounded men under fire at the Battle of the Marne, before being wounded again at La Bassee and invalided home. On the 8 April 1915, he was featured in the Express & Star again.

He was discharged on 26 March 1919, suffering from rheumatism, French fever and nephritis. He died in Wolverhampton in 1959.

Harry Monger

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Harry was born in Wolverhampton in 1882, the son of Thomas and Sarah Monger. In 1891 he was living with his parents at 14 Coven Street, along with brothers James, Thomas, Edward, and a 1 week old unnamed brother (on the census it simply says “not yet christened”). This brother was later named Joseph. In 1903, he married Margaret Donnelly in Wolverhampton. By 1911, they were living at 118 Lower Stafford Street, together with their two sons, James and John Henry. Harry was a whitesmith for a hardware manufacturer.

Harry enlisted in the 1st or 2nd Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 10410), and became a Lance Corporal. He was killed in action on 25 September 1915. He is remembered at the Loos Memorial.

Henry Glaze Hall

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Research for this blog post has been completed by Beth Savage, a work experience pupil from Wolverhampton Girls’ High School.

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Henry was born in Wolverhampton in 1896, the son of Laura Emily and Henry Bean Hall. Their address was 31 Waterloo Road South in 1901. In 1911, they were living at 17 Parkdale, Wolverhampton, along with Henry’s siblings Emily Muriel, Samuel Lindsay, Irish Kathleen and Mary Beatrice. Henry attended Wolverhampton Grammar School.

Henry enlisted and trained with the Queen’s Own Yeomanry, before being given a commission with the South Staffordshire Regiment and travelling to Egypt. He later served in Palestine and Macedonia. He transferred to the 17th Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps as a Lieutenant in June 1917, going to Salonica, in Greece. On 17 July 1918, according to an article in the Express & Star dated 25 July 1918, he was reported as missing. It was later confirmed that he had died on this date. He is remembered at the Doiran Memorial in Greece, as well as the memorial in the Lady Chapel of St Peter’s Church.