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Charles Arthur Mander and his teammates in the cricket team.

Charles Arthur Mander and his teammates in the cricket team.

Being from one of the more prominent Wolverhampton families did not excuse military service during the First World War. The 2nd Baronet Sir Charles Mander (seen in this photograph standing on the left) was born on 25 June 1884 at The Laurels, in Newbridge, the eldest son of Sir Charles Tertius and Mary Mander. After being educated at Eton and at Trinity College, Cambridge (where he read Natural Sciences), he joined the family business and eventually became Managing Director of Mander Brothers Ltd paint and varnish manufacturers. On 29 April 1913, he married Monica Claire Cotterill Neame from Kent, and they went on to have three children, Anne Marietta Patience, Corinthia Jill and Charles Marcus, between 1914 and 1922.

Charles Arthur Mander

Charles Arthur Mander

He joined the Staffordshire Yeomanry in 1906 and saw active service in Egypt, Syria and Palestine. Charles Nicholas Mander’s Varnished Leaves contains a whole chapter on Mander’s service during the First World War, including transcripts from his journal letters home. In 1917 he was struck by shrapnel in the ankle whilst involved in General Allenby’s advance that led to the capture of Jerusalem. He was able to rejoin his regiment in 1918. Mander left the military holding the rank of Major in 1925, and his medal card can be found at The National Archives.

Charles Arthur Mander in later life addressing the Council.

Charles Arthur Mander in later life addressing the Council.

After the war, Mander became a Conservative member of  Wolverhampton Council for 25 years, including serving as Mayor in 1932-1933 and again in 1936-1937. During his mayoral year Mander founded the Good Companions Club at Horseley Fields and he had an interest in many social service organisations. A keen sportsman, he became President of Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club and was also a governor and trustee of the Royal Wolverhampton School. He was also a member of the prominent Queen Square Syndicate. There is a blue plaque commemorating his contribution to Wolverhampton in North Street on the front of the Magistrates’ Courts. Mander died in 1951, at his home, Kilsall Hall, Shifnal, aged 66.

The details for this blog post came mainly from the research done by one of our volunteers, Margaret George.

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