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This post continues the story of Charles Daniel Wedge, compiled by volunteer, Lisa Gibbons.

Charles’ first letter (in the previous post) was by far the longest communication that was kept (by Mary Jane), no doubt Daniel sent other letters to his married sisters and Mary Jane who had moved back to her childhood home in 1916 following the sudden death of her mother Zillah. She kept house for her father and youngest sister Fanny who was only fourteen at the time. Mary Jane’s own husband was fighting with the 1/6th South Staffords in France at the time.

This and the following cards are addressed from Zerbst (Anhalt) – a Mannschaftsgefangenenlager (a soldier’s camp, as opposed to an officer’s camp) situated in the centre of the triangle formed by Hanover, Berlin and Leipzig. It is pre-printed with the word Kreiggefangenen sendung – which roughly translated means “Prisoner of War Mail”.

On 16th October 1918 Daniel writes home,

16 October 1918

16 October 1918

“Dear Dad and Sisters,

Just a line letting you know that I am quite well and hope you are the same.

I hope Jim is keeping well just give him my best respects and tell him to keep the ball rolling.

Your ever loving son, Daniel”

21 October 1918

21 October 1918

One week later, dated 21st October he sends a card with similar sentiments, under the date he writes “Germany”.

“Dear dad and Sisters,

Just a few lines hoping this finds you in the best of health as it leaves me at present. Shall send a photo when my regiment sends my clothes

Think I will close now, your ever loving son Daniel

Xxxxxx for Jimmy”

28 October 1918

28 October 1918

On the 28th October he writes,

“Dear Dad and Sisters,

Just a line hoping this finds you in the best of health as it leaves me at present. I have received a card from Dumbell saying a parcel as (sic) left for me. Will let you know if I get it. Will close now,

Your son Daniel”.

The Express and Star Newspaper and Dumbell’s Comfort Fund hosted a dinner at Heath Town Baths and entertainment for the returning Prisoners of War in 1919 – Daniel’s name is on the Roll. The document is kept in Wolverhampton Archives.

As the rest of the world is given the news that armistice had been signed, Daniel and his fellow prisoners were quite obviously unawares, and on 11th November 1819 he writes:

11 November 1918 page 1

11 November 1918 page 1

11 November 1918 page 2

11 November 1918 page 2

“Dear Dad and Sisters,

Just a line hoping to find you quite well as it leaves me at present. Am going on fine. I received Dumbell’s parcels and they were very good. I wrote to thank him very much. Your son Daniel.”

However, on 17th November he wrote this rather hurried card, brief and heart breaking. The excitement is actually visible in the rushed handwriting!

17 November 1918

17 November 1918

“Dear Dad,

Just a line hoping to find you quite well as it leaves me quite well

Expect me home for Xmas

Your ever loving son

Daniel”.

Charles Daniel Wedge returned home to Wolverhampton, he married, raised an extensive family and died on 10th February 1963.

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